Danielle Dory

Coming Short of Your Personal Goals? Bolster Your Performance & Create a GAP Model

In Blog, Business on June 20, 2012 at 11:56 am

This is it. After emailing your cover letter to your career counselor, parents, grandparents, and favorite high school teacher for review, you’ve landed yourself an interview.  After breaking the bank to find the perfect professional outfit from a store you only know about because your parents shop there, and getting fashion advice from the nice sales rep behind the counter, you have found the perfect high cut and calves length business dress (or if you’re a guy the perfect suit).   After staring into the mirror rehearsing possible responses to questions like, Why are you a fit for insert name/company? or, What can we as a company gain by hiring you?, you waited around for a few days, and finally landed the job/internship.  The papers are signed.  Direct deposit statements are set.  Orientation was a breeze, and you are finally sitting at your cubical with only a pop-up wall separating you from a floor of others who, at some point, went through the same process.  Finally, the initiation is over. Right? Wrong.  Your work is just starting.

Not the work that your direct supervisor is going to be handing you, or the meetings, or the piles of notes that you’ll take after every conversation so that you know how exactly the company functions.  I’m talking about your personal work.  It’s on and off the clock and it’s never ending. That work is called gap analysis and after you learn it you will be using it for the rest of your life.  Gap analysis is a tool with a lot of factors and many different models, but it boils down to looking at the space in between where you are now and where you want to be (Is the picture making since now?).   Now, that’s a pretty general definition, and when working with most things general, the solution has to be broken into multiple parts. The company I intern with had a seminar led by the VP of Strategic Workforce Solutions, where he introduced ways in which gap analysis can be used to bolster business performance using Dana and James Robinson’s model.  We are using it to bolster personal performance.

Let’s Run Through It:

Going for the Should

Analyze what Is

Pin down reasons for gap.

I will use a simplified fictional case study to first identify the:

Situation: I am a new intern/employee.

Purpose: Promotion.  I am here to promote myself through newly acquired knowledge, hard work and networks.  I am also here to gain a promotion in my career whether it is with the same company or other potential employers.

                GAP Analysis

                                Going for the Should:

By the end of this internship I should have propelled my growth in new computer software, made an impact in the company through projects/relationships/cross-generational learning.  Gain mentors and new friends.

                                Analyze the Is:

It is my first week working with the company.  I have yet to meet my division’s director.  I know how to use the basic computer programs, but there is a new program that is foreign to me.  I only know the person next to me.

                                Pin point the Causes:

External Factors (out of your control):  Newness, Difference in work experience…

Internal Factors:

Attitude- Smile and walk with your head up. Address people by their names when saying Hello.  It shows that you were paying attention when they said their name, and makes the casual Hello a lot more personal.

Training- See if the company offers program training or work seminars, or make friends with your peers- usually people are more than willing to help you out. Foundation of Knowledge- A successful project takes a lot of work. Start asking questions and start taking notes.  This will demonstrate a genuine interest in your work and for the project to succeed.

Shyness- Seek people out using a personal conversation initiative….

I’m sure you’re getting the point, now get to work!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: