Danielle Dory

Posts Tagged ‘Business’

More is More

In Blog, Business on June 27, 2012 at 2:00 pm

I know you have all heard the saying “less is more” but for the first two months of your internship or your new job more is defiantly more.   When a project or task is given to you, either go beyond what is expected, or complete the task with meticulous detail and foresight.  Google samples of the format you have been asked to use and partake in some self teachingOne of your major goals as an intern or new employee should be self-promotion, so put yourself out there by going the extra mile by handing in a product that goes beyond being solid.

It’s important that you follow a more is more work ethic for multiple reasons:

  1. First Impressions

First impressions really are everything, but I’m sure you didn’t need me to tell you that.

  1. Learning Curve

    You’re going to get the most information about a company thrown at you in the first few months of employment.  Taking the extra time to hand over dynamic products will help you to sort out all the information that you are learning and understand the inner workings of a company. 

    You’re also learning how to do your job to your best ability.  Once you give your boss the most you can (within reason and scope of the assignment), they will be better able to gauge your ability and fill in the gaps from there. 

Yes, going the extra mile is challening, and it will most definatly raise the bar of what is expected of you.  Adhering to the more is more philosophy is a lot of work, but once it becomes routine, tasks that took you a day to complete will take less time and less effort.

  1. Aesthetics

This principle doesn’t only apply to content.  It also applies to the ascetics of a project, proposal or document- partially.  The more do to a document while increasing the functionality of an assignment and keeping it user friendly, the better.  If you’re creating a document in Excel, throw in some conditional status boxes or make the heading cells a certain color to distinguish them from the value cells. If you are using a generic template make sure you take the extra time to verify that all your information and styling is consistent.  Don’t have a list that is part sentences and part statements.  Don’t have some subtitles underlined while others are italicized.  Go over your final project with a fine tooth comb.  

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Read and Digest: Today’s Lunch Sell By 6/26/2012

In Read & Digest on June 26, 2012 at 1:48 pm

I apoligize for the neglect.  I know you’re starving, but I hope I can hold you over with today’s lunch… and for our first article, it looks like Facebook is at it again! (audience groans)

Facebook Draws User Ire with Email Switcheroo

 

Forbes, I’ll Have to Respectfully Disagree.

In Blog on June 21, 2012 at 12:50 pm

If you’re anything like me, you enjoy a busy day with minimal downtime, but everyone needs a little break.  I think Susan Adams meant well when she posted this article a few days ago on Forbes.  I’ll admit that Eight Ways Goofing Off Can Make You More Productive is an enticing title, but 3 out of the 8 suggestions would have led me straight to the unemployment line – especially as an intern or new employee !  Here are columnist Susan Adam’s 8 suggestions, and alternative solutions that I offer:

    1. Take a walk around the block.

Luckily, my job is excellent about encouraging employees to walk around its campus.  There are scenic walking paths, and during lunch time groups of 2’s and 3’s own the road.  Yet, I understand that not every company has the same environment, and not every boss is going to be okay with you randomly leaving for a stroll in the middle of the day.

Instead I suggest taking a walk around your mental pathways.  Plug your headphones into your laptop or MP3 Player and just zone out for a few minutes.  Take a second to reflect or meditate on your next meeting or something personal.  Take some time to center yourself.  It may not be the change in scenery you were craving, but it’ll be a change in mental scenery.

2.   Take a nap.

ABSOLUTELY NOT.  If I were to list the top ten ways to get on the bad side of your boss, this would probably be in the top 5.  The best replacement for this piece of “advice”? Make a cup of coffee and have a chat with someone in the kitchen.

3. Chat with a colleague.

This is a great suggestion, and it will defiantly help you with your personal conversation initiative.  There is absolutely no harm in conversing with your colleagues.

4.  Run an errand.

Again, this is a tad inappropriate. Instead organize yourself so that you have time to run your errands later. Or just de-clutter your life. I suggest cleaning out your email, or creating those new inbox folders in your Outlook that you never had time to make.     Another constructive way to pass time, and step away from work without leaving your desk, is working on your personal career goals.

5.   Brush your teeth.

Adams pretty much correlates the removing of plaque to ridding yourself of sluggishness.  If this works for you, great!  Me? As the new person in the office,  I don’t really want to be known as the girl who is always brushing her teeth in the office bathroom.

Instead, pop a stick of gum into your mouth.  The minty zing really does help to give you a little boost of attentiveness.

6.   Spend ten minutes checking Facebook, Twitter or other social media sites.

I am not a hypocrite.  I think that most of us take the occasional peek onto Facebook.  After four years at college  mastering the art of procrastination while achieving major success, by multitasking with Facebook or Twitter, Facebooking and surfing the web are hard habits to break.

BUT it is how you web surf that makes it work appropriate.   Above facebooking, I would recommend checking out LinkedIn, that way you can continue working on your network and expand your knowledge of other industries.  I would also recommending web-surfing on news sites like Forbes, CNN, NYT, BBC or the Wall-Street Journal.  Or you can read an industry/career blog  like…maybe… this one?

7.  Go to the gym.

ONLY if your company has a gym on site.

If your company doesn’t and you’re feeling a bit antsy, check out this website:

        • 29 Exercises You Can Do At Your Desk

If you want a good laugh, check out this website:

 8.  Go out to lunch.

I highly recommend going out to lunch once in a while, even if you are not going out to eat.  Sometimes a nice little drive, or some time spent window shopping, can do wonders.  If you’re still feeling antsy, maybe you can go find a nice quiet place besides work to do the outrageous moves from A Workout At Work.

 

Coming Short of Your Personal Goals? Bolster Your Performance & Create a GAP Model

In Blog, Business on June 20, 2012 at 11:56 am

This is it. After emailing your cover letter to your career counselor, parents, grandparents, and favorite high school teacher for review, you’ve landed yourself an interview.  After breaking the bank to find the perfect professional outfit from a store you only know about because your parents shop there, and getting fashion advice from the nice sales rep behind the counter, you have found the perfect high cut and calves length business dress (or if you’re a guy the perfect suit).   After staring into the mirror rehearsing possible responses to questions like, Why are you a fit for insert name/company? or, What can we as a company gain by hiring you?, you waited around for a few days, and finally landed the job/internship.  The papers are signed.  Direct deposit statements are set.  Orientation was a breeze, and you are finally sitting at your cubical with only a pop-up wall separating you from a floor of others who, at some point, went through the same process.  Finally, the initiation is over. Right? Wrong.  Your work is just starting.

Not the work that your direct supervisor is going to be handing you, or the meetings, or the piles of notes that you’ll take after every conversation so that you know how exactly the company functions.  I’m talking about your personal work.  It’s on and off the clock and it’s never ending. That work is called gap analysis and after you learn it you will be using it for the rest of your life.  Gap analysis is a tool with a lot of factors and many different models, but it boils down to looking at the space in between where you are now and where you want to be (Is the picture making since now?).   Now, that’s a pretty general definition, and when working with most things general, the solution has to be broken into multiple parts. The company I intern with had a seminar led by the VP of Strategic Workforce Solutions, where he introduced ways in which gap analysis can be used to bolster business performance using Dana and James Robinson’s model.  We are using it to bolster personal performance.

Let’s Run Through It:

Going for the Should

Analyze what Is

Pin down reasons for gap.

I will use a simplified fictional case study to first identify the:

Situation: I am a new intern/employee.

Purpose: Promotion.  I am here to promote myself through newly acquired knowledge, hard work and networks.  I am also here to gain a promotion in my career whether it is with the same company or other potential employers.

                GAP Analysis

                                Going for the Should:

By the end of this internship I should have propelled my growth in new computer software, made an impact in the company through projects/relationships/cross-generational learning.  Gain mentors and new friends.

                                Analyze the Is:

It is my first week working with the company.  I have yet to meet my division’s director.  I know how to use the basic computer programs, but there is a new program that is foreign to me.  I only know the person next to me.

                                Pin point the Causes:

External Factors (out of your control):  Newness, Difference in work experience…

Internal Factors:

Attitude- Smile and walk with your head up. Address people by their names when saying Hello.  It shows that you were paying attention when they said their name, and makes the casual Hello a lot more personal.

Training- See if the company offers program training or work seminars, or make friends with your peers- usually people are more than willing to help you out. Foundation of Knowledge- A successful project takes a lot of work. Start asking questions and start taking notes.  This will demonstrate a genuine interest in your work and for the project to succeed.

Shyness- Seek people out using a personal conversation initiative….

I’m sure you’re getting the point, now get to work!

Who Called the Jagron Police?

In Blog, Business, Public Speaking on June 12, 2012 at 3:55 pm

Jargon Police Gears Up
(and no I’m not talking about a car)

A lot of people are posting and agreeing with this survey by Forbes. Some of their points are valid, but I just want to know why Max Mallet, Brett Nelson and Chris Steiner have a vendetta against superfolus literary devices… http://www.forbes.com/pictures/ekij45gdh/most-annoying-business-jargon/#content